Authors Posts by Richard Scott

Richard Scott

Richard Scott
211 POSTS
Richard Scott is a health care reporter focusing on health policy and public health. Richard keeps tabs on national health trends from his Philadelphia location and is an active member of the Association of Health Care Journalists.

Researchers Are Developing Contact Lenses that Can Detect Disease

With bio-sensing contact lenses that can assess blood glucose levels, the researchers hope to improve health outcomes by replacing older, painful methods of diabetes monitoring.

Celiac Disease Induced By Common Virus: Study

When given to mice, an infection known as reovirus sparked an inflammatory response that led the immune system to “overreact” to gluten and essentially bring on celiac disease.

Seasonal Flu Shots Significantly Reduce Risk of Pediatric Death: Study

Among children with underlying medical conditions, the seasonal vaccine cut the risk of death by more than half.

These Countries Have the Fewest Crying Babies

Researchers are studying why babies in Denmark, Japan and Germany cry the least over the first 12 weeks of life, whereas babies in Canada, England and Italy cry more.

Add Legumes to Your Diet to Cut Diabetes Risk, Suggests Study

Eating about one-and-a-half servings of legumes per week was associated with a 35% reduced risk of developing diabetes.

Sex, Weight Mismatches May Lead to Organ Transplant Failures

The new research sheds light on the complex variables that make a good match for organ donation.

Breast Cancer Grows More Rapidly in Obese Patients: Study

The new study suggests that cancer essentially thrives in an environment full of fatty tissue.

Music Therapy May Reduce Pain After Surgery

Patients recovering from surgery who received a live music performance, which was tailored to their musical preferences, all reported a drop in pain level.

Most Cookbooks Lack Sufficient Food-Safety Information, Study Says

The study authors found a particular grievance with a common characteristic of cookbooks: using the duration of cooking in place of an internal temperature reading.

Measuring Brainwaves May Predict Reading Success in Children

Researchers noticed a unique pattern of brain activity among children who later achieved higher academic success.

New Facial Recognition Technology Can Detect Rare Disease

Diagnosing a rare disease in children called DiGeorge syndrome may be as simple as taking a photo with new facial recognition software.

Genetic Variant Tied to Greater Obesity Risk in African Americans

The new focus opens up additional opportunity for understanding — and perhaps preventing — rates of obesity among African Americans.

Scientists Grow Beating Heart Cells on Spinach Leaves

The key to the new research rests on the methods by which plants, such as spinach, transport fluids and other substances.

Smartphone App Claims to Accurately Test Male Fertility

The fertility analyzer uses an “optical attachment” that plugs into a smartphone and a one-use device to collect a semen sample.

Breast Implant Type May Increase Risk of Developing Rare Cancer

The FDA believes that evidence it has gathered since 2011 regarding breast cancer cases is enough to warrant a new designation for the rare type of T-cell lymphoma that can occur following breast implants.

Deadly Spider Venom Holds Promise as Stroke Treatment

The results so far, gained in studies on rats, show a powerful way to limit the effects of stroke damage.

The Key to Lower Blood Pressure Might Be in Your Inbox

After 12 months of web-based interventions, the study group saw their average systolic pressure drop closer to the normal blood pressure range.

Children Are Already Less Active by Age 7, Study Finds

A new study finds that both boys and girls experience a gradual decline in physical activity starting at age seven, not during adolescence as previously thought.

Too Many Women Seeking to Become Pregnant Lack Proper Nutrition: Study

The study authors also found that nutrition scores rose in accordance with a person’s education level, with the best scores generally among those with a college degree.

More Veggies in Your Diet May Reduce Stress

People who ate three to four servings of vegetables per day had a 12 percent reduced risk of stress than those who consumed just one serving or none at all.

Brain Buzz: A Shot of Electricity May Boost Your Memory

Researchers hope their technique for stimulating the brain through electrical signals can help patients with existing neurological challenges.

This Fish May Teach Humans How to Regenerate Eye Cells

Studying the ability of the zebrafish to regenerate eye cells may lead to new treatments for people with vision loss.

Too Little Gluten May Increase Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

You may want to rethink your gluten-free diet; a study conducted with participants for over 30 years revealed that those who ate gluten were less at-risk for developing diabetes.

Jet Stream Vaccine Technology May Replace Needles

The MucoJet device is a painless way to administer vaccines orally.

Eating More Omega-3 Fats May Reduce Harm of Air Pollution

Researchers found that consuming omega-3 fatty acids led to a reduction of up to 50% of any harm caused by air pollution.

Wireless Smartphone Device Could Reduce Migraine Pain

The high-tech device could be very attractive to individuals who are wary of taking prescription painkillers for their migraines.

Gene-Therapy Used to Cure Boy of Sickle Cell Disease

French researchers have cured a 15-year-old boy of sickle cell disease by interfering with the production of faulty hemoglobin.

Colon Cancer Rates Are Increasing Among Millennials

In what researchers are calling a historic reversal in cancer incidence, colon and rectal cancer rates among millennials and young adults are climbing.

Frequent Tanning Bed Usage Could Be Costly to Your Health

Researchers estimated the impact of lifetime costs for patients identified with tanning bed-associated skin cancer, adding up medical costs, years of life lost and lost earnings due to disease.

Brain Cells Actually Favor One Parent’s Genes Over the Other

The new study adds a wrinkle to the current understanding of genetics and may hold the answer to the cause and incidence of some brain disorders.

Fasting Diet Reprograms Pancreatic Cells, Reverses Diabetes in Mice

The researchers also assessed pancreatic cells from humans with Type 1 diabetes and discovered reprogrammed insulin production after a fasting cycle.

Compound in Red Wine May Boost Lung Health

Researchers tested inhaled resveratrol treatments on mice and found that it ultimately put the brakes on lung decline.

U.S. Life Expectancy Scores Poorly in 2030 Projections

Of the 35 countries assessed, the U.S. ranks 27th in projected life expectancy for both women and men by the year 2030.

Balancing Gut Bacteria Could Be the Key to Solving Chronic Stomach Problems

Researchers are hopeful that a new method of cutting the amount of harmful bacteria in the stomach and intestines can reduce gut-related disease burden.

Gluten-Free Dieters May Have Unsafe Levels of Arsenic, Mercury

A study found that individuals who adhered to a gluten-free diet had twice the amount of arsenic in their urine and 70 percent more mercury in their blood compared to people on a regular gluten diet.

Married People Have Lower Levels of This Harmful Stress Hormone

A new study found that being married essentially reduces a person’s chances of facing stress-derived health problems, and the waning level of cortisol among spouses has a lot to do with it.

Sibling Rivalry: Are First-Born Children Smarter?

Researchers found that parents of multiple children routinely alter their treatment of non-first born children, which affects their IQ and perhaps even personality traits.

Scientists Mimic Deadly Rabies Virus to Destroy Brain Cancer Cells

Researchers have modeled nanoparticles the same size and shape as rabies to reach the brain's nerve cells, with the goal of targeting cancerous ones.

Peppertree Berries May Fight Deadly Superbugs

The ready abundance of the peppertree plant means that, should the treatment prove effective in human trials, the medical community would face no shortage of the disease-fighting berries.

Air Pollution Linked to Higher Diabetes Risk Among Kids

The study adds a new threat to the list of lifestyle and environmental factors that contribute to diabetes, note the researchers.

Breathe, Breathe, Bite: Eating During Labor May Be Beneficial

New research finds that allowing pregnant women to ingest more than water or ice chips during labor is tied to a 16-minute shorter labor, on average.

New Technology Deciphers Thoughts of Paralyzed People Who Can’t Speak

By measuring a person’s electrical activity in the brain, the brain-computer interface allowed patients to communicate in response to simple questions.

Innovative Behind-the-Ear Technique Avoids Neck Scarring After Thyroid Surgery

The technique involves making an incision behind the ear instead of beneath the voice box, where thyroidectomy procedures traditionally occur.

Something Interesting Happens to Our Brains While We Sleep

Scientists believe that brain synapses shrink during sleep and expand when activated during one’s waking hours, and such expansion is a marker for learning and memory.

Hold the Paper: Fast-Food Wrappers Contain Harmful Chemicals

The substances have been tied to severe health problems, such as testicular and kidney cancer, and scientists warn that chemicals in fast-food wrappers may “leach” onto the food products.

Complications During Pregnancy May Increase Autism Risk in Children: Study

The researchers found a number of pregnancy-related complications that were associated with an elevated risk of developing autism after birth, like pre-eclampsia and birth asphyxia.

Party Danger: Balloons Pop Louder Than 12-Gauge Shotgun Blasts

The researchers hope their new study will create greater awareness about the hearing perils of balloons — similar to the acceptance of sunscreen as a normal part of life.

Scientists Uncover Key Fat-Burning Gene in New Study

While previous studies had found many links between the brain hormone serotonin and energy use, the core question remained: How does it impact metabolism?

Puzzling Wave of Amnesia Hits 14 Patients in Eastern Massachusetts

Researchers are still trying to figure out what happened to 14 people in Massachusetts who came down with amnesia from 2012-2016.

More Mushrooms in Your Diet May Help to Prevent Alzheimer’s: Study

Researchers have discovered that mushrooms have major brain-boosting and curative powers.

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