Authors Posts by Tori Linville

Tori Linville

Tori Linville
153 POSTS
Tori Linville is a freelance writer and editor from Clarksville, Tennessee. When she isn't writing or teaching, she's faithfully watching her alma mater, the University of Alabama, dominate the football field.

Check Your Sunscreen for These Harmful Ingredients

Don't simply be swayed by that high SPF rating when choosing a sunscreen.

Scientists Reveal New Prostate Cancer Vaccine

After receiving the vaccine, 77 percent of trial patients' tumors stopped growing, and 45 percent of trial patients saw tumor shrinkage.

Why Women Apologize So Much and How to Stop

Why are women serial apologizers, and how do we stop saying 'sorry' for unnecessary offenses?

10 Sex Facts You Probably Didn’t Know

Read about why people prefer coffee over sex, and other surprising sex facts.

These 5 Fashion Trends Are Hurting Women’s Bodies

From wearing constricting clothing to carrying a heavy purse, women should rethink these fashion trends for the sake of their health.

Alternate-Day Fasting May Have Same Results as Counting Calories

Researchers found that alternate-day fasting didn’t make that much of a difference in weight loss compared to people who counted calories.

Arthritis Vaccine Could Emerge From Stem Cell Technology

The autoregulation that the stem cells can provide has the possibility to help treat diseases early, before symptoms become serious health issues, the study said.

Child Development May Depend on Age of Father at Conception

While the scientists were focused on the ages of the fathers, the children’s social skills were affected for children with both younger and older fathers.

Lefties Are More Likely to Have This Face Shape and Tuberculosis Risk

The association between face shape and tuberculosis susceptibility could be a genetic modification finding its roots in the genes that determine left-handedness, the study said.

3D-Printed Patch Can Heal Hearts

The 3D bioprinting allows for the patch to be a close match to heart tissue structure.

Could This ‘Love Hormone’ Treat Drug Addiction?

Oxytocin is a feel-good hormone, so researchers are studying its effects as a drug addiction treatment.

New Chewing Gum May Detect Cancer

The gum detects “volatiles” within saliva as it’s chewed and is then studied to find if the chewer produced chemicals associated with cancer.

Night Owls With This Gene Feel ‘Perpetual Jet Lag’

Researchers say that people with this genetic variant have a different quality of life, mostly because of their night owl tendencies.

Your Household Pet Could Keep Your Child Healthy

New research reveals you may want to have a furry friend around even before your baby arrives.

Fruit Juice Could Be Causing Your Child to Gain Weight

Data from the observational studies demonstrated clinically significant weight gain for children younger than the age of two.

Scientists Create Solar-Powered Skin for Prosthetic Hands

Scientists have created a new use for the sun’s rays.

Social Life May Be Linked to Sense of Smell as We Age

While women performed better than men during the olfactory testing, a significant association was found for women between the odor identification and their overall social lives.

This Amazon Tribe Has the Healthiest Hearts in the World, Experts Say

Though the Tsimane have other health issues, their low risk for heart disease made a new record.

Screen Time Could Lead to Increased Risk of Diabetes in Children

The research found that children who reported three or more hours of screen time had higher levels of body fat compared to those who reported an hour or less of screen time.

Shorter Men Might Be More Likely to Bald Prematurely

It was also found that health issues such as heart disease and prostate cancer can occur more often for those who suffer from premature male-pattern baldness.

Want a Better Memory? Train Your Brain

There are actual 'memory athletes' who use certain strategies to strengthen their ability to remember things, and researchers set out to study what, if anything, made their brains different.

Night Owls Might Be More Likely to Make Unhealthy Food Choices

The study authors said the habits worsened for night owls in the evening, as those with later sleeping habits had higher intakes of sugar, fat and saturated fatty acids.

Social Media May Isolate People More Than It Connects Them

The study authors said that increased time using social media could displace authentic social experiences that could actually decrease any feelings of social isolation.

Study Confirms What Mothers Already Know: They’re Tired

Having children in the household was the only factor linked to sleep deprivation for women 45 years and younger.

Too Much Sugar May Lead to Alzheimer’s, Study Says

Sugar breaks down in a reaction known as glycation, and its byproducts can cause damage to brain cells.

Komodo Dragon Blood Could Be Used to Fight Infections

Komodo dragons possess antimicrobial saliva and blood, a discovery that could have broader implications for fighting infections in humans.

High Levels of This Inherited Protein May Cause Heart Attack, Stroke

Along with cholesterol levels and blood pressure, Lipoprotein(a) is another factor that should be checked at the doctor.

Your Creativity Could Affect How Much You Sleep

The two kinds of creativity, visual and verbal, and how they affected sleep duration, time and even quality, were observed in undergraduate students.

Brain Scans Could Spot Autism Even Sooner in Infants

In the study, the researchers correctly predicted 80 percent of the infants who would meet the criteria for an autism diagnosis at age two.

11-Year-Old Girl Invents Her Own Glittery Prosthetics

Jordan Reeves' limb difference isn't slowing her down; she's embracing her unique condition by raising awareness for other children with limb differences and even designing her own 3D prosthetics.

Thirdhand Smoke May Be More Toxic Than Secondhand Smoke

The researchers found that exposure to thirdhand smoke, or the tobacco pollutants often left behind on surfaces, caused significant increases in damage to human DNA.

Here’s What Space Travel Does to the Brains of Astronauts

The study found that the brain’s gray matter decreased or increased, based on how long the astronauts were in space.

Losing Several Teeth Before 65 May Increase Risk of Death

Oral hygiene is a significant factor in one's overall well-being and health.

Study Says You’re Probably Eating Plastic When You Order Seafood

Ocean pollution has gotten so bad that sea animals are ingesting more and more microplastics, which we inevitably ingest from seafood.

Your Roommate Could Be Changing Your Genes, Researchers Say

If you're a night owl but your roommate is a morning person, this disruption in lifestyle could possibly alter your genes and adversely affect your health.

Immunotherapy Could Be the Next Step to Preventing Alzheimer’s

Solanezumab is the name of the antibody researchers are using with hopes to interrupt or even reverse the formulation of beta amyloid plaque within the brain.

Testing Your Tears Could Reveal What Vitamins You Need

Tears could be an alternate source of diagnostic fluid for assessing nutritional deficiencies, and studies show that people with these deficiencies blink more.

Stop Blaming Your Joint Pain on the Weather

It's been long-believed that the weather influences joint pain, but new research puts this theory to rest once and for all.

3D-Printed Blood Vessels Successfully Implanted Into Monkeys

3D printing technology for medical purposes is still in its infancy, but its utilization for blood vessels looks promising.

Solar Cells Could Revolutionize the Way Pacemakers Are Powered

Instead of costly, cumbersome batteries, wearable solar cell devices could soon be used to power electronic implants, like pacemakers and brain stimulators.

Afternoon Naps May Improve Your Brain Health

Researchers have discovered the ideal amount of time adults should nap in the afternoon for optimum cognitive performance.

Yoga Could Play Important Role for Kids With Cancer

Preliminary studies show that participating in yoga classes can help kids with cancer, as well as their parents, manage the physical and mental effects of treatment.

Quitting Smoking? Here Are Some Key Steps to Kicking the Habit

Setting a goal that's realistic is the best way to achieve it, study says.

‘Chemo-Brain’ Can Last 6 Months for Breast Cancer Patients

A recent study found that “chemo-brain” hinders chemotherapy patients after treatment.

In-Bed Cycling May Be Viable Exercise for ICU Patients

ICU patients could recover more quickly by exercising using a bicycle during their stay.

8 Ways to Say Goodbye to Stress in 2017

By making small, achievable tweaks in how you think and interact with others on a daily basis, you can make a stress-free New Year that much more real.

ALS Patient Designs Home He Controls With His Eyes

The home uses a wireless signal that allows Steve Saling and other patients to open and close doors, call an elevator and operate TV and lights.

Too Much Processed Meat Could Make Your Asthma Worse

If you’re one of the millions of Americans suffering from asthma, you might want to rethink your next ham sandwich.

Teen Violence Can Spread Like the Flu: Study

A study found that teens are 48 percent more likely to get involved in a serious fight if a friend had engaged in the same behavior.

Doctors Use Fish Skin to Treat Woman’s Burn Injuries

Maria Ines Candido da Silva was working as a waitress in Brazil when a gas cooker explosion left her with horrific injuries.

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