IntelliRoll: The Foam Roller With Curve Appeal

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Foam rolling is an important yet often overlooked part of a fitness routine. If used properly, foam rollers can help you recover from injuries, ease knots, get rid of adhesions in muscles and connective tissue, and increase flexibility, making exercising more effective.

But not all foam rollers are created equal. Our bodies, unlike a standard, cylinder-shaped foam roller, are not flat. We have curves, and often a standard foam roller can’t reach those contoured spots. That’s where the IntelliRoll comes in — its innovative design was built to work with the natural curves of the body.

Dr. K with the IntelliRoll

The IntelliRoll was designed by Dr. Sevak Khodabakhshian DC, QME, otherwise known as Dr. K, who realized that the foam roller desperately needed an update.

The patented design features an indented Spine Zone surrounded on both sides by sensory dots, which help massage stubborn knots and muscle tension in the hard-to-reach area between the shoulder blades.

The concave Body Zones on each side are for the arms, legs, thighs and many other areas of the body. And the lateral platforms at the end of the IntelliRoll are great for a bit more pressure on the different muscle areas; they also ensure stability.

Closeup of the IntelliRoll’s unique “spine zone”

“The basic rule to IntelliRolling is this: Stay on the muscles and avoid the bony prominences and larger peripheral joints,” Dr. K explained in a video. “The patented contours have been designed to make this easy. Pressure should only be felt where there is direct contact with the IntelliRoll.”

Dr. K understands how difficult it is to recover from injuries. As a teenager, Dr. K was an avid skateboarder and — like many skaters — dealt with the subsequent injuries. In his 20s, he fell in love with surfing, which took him to Hawaii, where he was in a bit over his head at times.

“All these pros were paddling out next to me…Kelly Slater, that should have been the first clue that I had no business being out there,” Dr. K recalled. “I hit the bottom and I remember the board came up and smacked me in the face. Split my septum, chipped my teeth, gave me a whiplash.”  

The IntelliRoll in action

Faced with those injuries, Dr. K started looking for solutions. First he became a chiropractor and rehab specialist. But then he realized from experience and his clients that “a patient doesn’t want to be a patient.” There had to be a better, more improved at-home solution to dealing with pain — enter the IntelliRoll.

“The concave surface provides more surface area coverage, so you put it anywhere on your body, you’re massaging multiple muscle groups at one time,” Dr. K said of IntelliRoll’s design. “So it’s both efficient, incrementally more comfortable but far more effective.”  

One of many ways the IntelliRoll can be used

However, you don’t even have to be an athlete to use the IntelliRoll. Many people suffer from back pain and poor posture, often due to sitting in an office all day. Just a few minutes with a foam roller every night will improve posture and reduce back pain.

“Even without any injuries, human beings spend a lot of time in forward postures, so as a result, their upper back gets stuck in this forward position,” Dr. K said. “And because of the rib cage, it’s an area that doesn’t shift back, so we lose the ability to extend our upper back.”

Again, that’s where the IntelliRoll’s design comes into play, with the Spine Zone hitting parts of your back that traditional foam rollers can’t reach.

Prices for the IntelliRoll start at $59.99. Vital Updates readers can get 10% off their IntelliRoll purchase. To get the discount, click here to visit the IntelliRoll shop, and then use the discount code VITAL10 on the checkout page.

Danielle Tarasiuk
Danielle Tarasiuk is a multimedia journalist based in Los Angeles. Her work has been published on AllDay.com, Yahoo! Sports, KCET, and NPR-affiliate stations KPCC and KCRW. She’s a proud Sarah Lawrence College and USC Annenberg alumn.
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