Authors Posts by Richard Scott

Richard Scott

Richard Scott
244 POSTS
Richard Scott is a health care reporter focusing on health policy and public health. Richard keeps tabs on national health trends from his Philadelphia location and is an active member of the Association of Health Care Journalists.

Bathroom Hand-Dryers Actually Spew Fecal Matter Into the Air

Bathroom hand-dryers aren’t only expelling hot air...

Eating Pasta Linked to Weight Loss: Study

Researchers from St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto took a fresh look at more than two dozen previously conducted scientific trials involving pasta consumption.

Could Drinking Just One High-Fat Milkshake Mimic Heart Disease?

A small study of healthy males found that eating a 1,000-calorie milkshake led to a troubling change among the men’s red blood cells.

Obesity May Erase Taste Buds

The new findings suggest there may be an underlying physical mechanism, similar to addiction traits among substance abuse, contributing to the national weight trends.

Daily Coffee Reduces Risk of Type 2 Diabetes, Says Study

Coffee contains an abundance of micronutrients and antioxidants, and researchers discovered in animal trials that one compound in particular helps the body regulate fasting glucose levels

Nighttime Noise May Increase Risk of Heart Disease

Living in the 21st century comes with perks, but it also has its drawbacks – including some, like nighttime noise, that people may not even be aware of.

Drinking More Likely to Leave You with Visual Blind Spots

A new study found that a certain visual phenomenon is heightened when a person is intoxicated.

Artificial Eye Corrects Astigmatism, Focuses on Objects Automatically

The nanoengineered eye, which combines a “metalens” with artificial muscle technology, bests its human counterpart in some instances.

Using Cleaning Products at Home as Harmful as Long-Term Smoking

The negative results were found among professional cleaners as well as those who cleaned around the house.

Nanogenerator Draws Power From the Body to Charge Devices

Charging the battery of your phone or wearable device may someday be as simple as wiggling your finger...

Adult Cannabis Use May Improve Cognitive Function

Researchers analyzed MRI scans of adults using cannabis to find some interesting improvements in brain health.

E-Cigarettes May Be Beneficial to People Who Want to Stop Smoking

New research studied whether vaping is "safer" than smoking nicotine cigarettes.

Nutritious Elixir Helps Women Run and Bike Faster: Study

Physically active women who took a monthly supplement containing essential minerals sliced nearly a minute off a three-mile run – and gained other aerobic...

Transcendental Meditation Proves Effective for Veterans With PTSD

The study found that after one month of meditation therapy, 80 percent of the veterans saw a drastic enough reduction of symptoms that they were no longer considered to have PTSD.

Ingestible Sensor Offers Inside Peek Into Patients’ Gut Health

Understanding the presence and amount of gases in the stomach and intestines can help scientists better deal with gastrointestinal diseases and other disorders.

Tomatoes, Apples Boost Lung Health Among Ex-Smokers: Study

The study reveals the benefits of a diet rich in specific fruits.

Gene Therapy That Treats Rare Blindness Gains FDA Approval

Experts believe the cost for the novel treatment may soar to $1 million or more.

Study Uses Sperm as Cancer-Destroying Missiles

The novel findings offer an exciting glimpse of precision medicine using organic matter to combat cancer.

New ‘Black Box’ Device Puts Surgeons’ Skills to the Test

A new tracking device may find its way into the operating room and measure – by video and movement – how well a surgeon...

Why Your DNA May Be Sabotaging Your Diet

The researchers tested five types of diets on mice, dividing the animals into four groups based on similarities in DNA.

Does Alcohol Type Affect Your Mood?

How does drinking beer or liquor, for example, variably change your mood? Researchers set to find out by studying various types of alcohol.

Squirrels’ Long Slumber May Hold the Key to Stroke Treatment

Squirrels may be a surprising source of potential life-saving stroke therapy.

Long-term Acetaminophen Use in Pregnancy Tied to ADHD in Kids

The link is found only among pregnant women who took a product containing acetaminophen for 29 days in succession or more.

Fructan Carbs, Not Gluten, May Actually Be the Cause of Gut Issues

Perhaps gluten has been miscast as the culprit the whole time.

Does Heart Surgery in the Afternoon Improve Survival Rates?

Heart surgery performed in the afternoon may give patients a better chance of survival, considering the body's circadian rhythms.

Just 1 to 10 Mutations Cause Most Types of Cancer

The new findings assessed more than 7,500 tumors across nearly 30 distinct types of cancer.

Scientists Discover the Hiding Place of the Brain’s Long-Term Memories

Our memories, it turns out, don’t reside in some abstract space or inside an impenetrable lock-box.

Magic Mushrooms May ‘Reset’ Depressed Patients’ Brains

The researchers note that using psilocybin as a treatment method is a tactic that goes back centuries, and one that may be beneficial for hard-to-treat cases of depression.

Change in Weather Tied to Heart Events, Morbidity

Canadian researchers found that precipitous changes in the environment don’t bode well for a person’s health.

Gene Therapy Reverses the Tide of Multiple Sclerosis in Mice

Among the animals studied, up to 80 percent of them went into virtually complete remission of the condition even after experiencing paralysis in their hind limbs.

How Antibiotics Can Augment Cancer Therapy

The groundbreaking discovery reveals that a simple intervention may reverse course and prevent certain bacteria from interfering with drug therapy.

Could Blocking Sweet Taste Receptors Prevent Sinus Infections?

Blocking a person’s sweet taste receptors allows the natural infection-fighting ability of bitter taste receptors to flourish.

Scientists Use CRISPR to Change a Flower’s Color

Scientists have changed the genetic makeup of flowers by using DNA splicing technology, which reveals the vast potential of CRISPR.

Drug Therapy Suppresses Inflammation to Reduce Heart Risk

The researchers tested several different doses of a powerful anti-inflammatory drug on a group of about 10,000 study participants, with the doses ranging from low to medium to high.

New HPV Vaccine Aims to Eradicate Cervical Cancer

The new vaccine, currently under the consideration of Australia’s national health center, would prevent the infection of five additional strains of HPV.

Researchers Suggest Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Procrastinators

Because procrastination can impede a person’s wellness, the new study may help chronic time-wasters improve their outlook.

Do CT Scans Encourage Smokers to Quit?

Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate by far among all types of cancer, but the new study suggests that exposing people to a CT screening of their lungs may have a significant impact on smoking rates.

Are Your Taste Buds Dulled? You May Be Prone to Obesity

A new study found that participants with compromised taste receptors sought out more sugar.

Kids Who Drink Non-Cow’s Milk Are Shorter Than Peers

A study showed that kids who drank plant-based milk only were significantly shorter than their peers who drank regular cow's milk.

Does Green Tea Improve Cognition?

The study adds compelling evidence to support the overall benefits of green tea consumption, while finding even more reason to brew a batch.

Clinical Trials for Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Coming Soon 

The vaccine centers around previous research that has identified a common type of virus, called an enterovirus, as a cause of type 1 diabetes.

Sperm Counts Are Drastically Dropping Across Western Nations

Over the past thirty years, total sperm count among men in Western countries has declined nearly 60 percent, and sperm concentration has dropped by more than 52 percent.

Baby Talk: Language Development Starts Prior to Birth

A new study found evidence that early speech recognition occurs in the womb.

Children Without Fathers Are Likelier to Be Stressed

A study found that fatherless children are more likely to have shorter telomeres, a part of DNA that’s linked to stress and disease.

Long-Term Breastfeeding May Reduce Mother’s Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

The link between breastfeeding and lower MS risk showed to be strongest for women who breastfeed for 15 months or more.

Experts Warn Flip-Flops Can Cause Problems for Feet

Flip-flops are a flop when it comes to providing adequate protection and support.

Are You Consuming the Right Kind of Vitamin D?

New research shows that one form of vitamin D supplementation is twice as better at raising levels in the body.

Study Reveals Least and Most Active Countries

Researchers tracked the activity levels of more than 700,000 people around the world who used an activity app called Argus.

At-Home Medication Errors Are on the Rise in America

The number of medication errors in American homes has doubled since 2000.

Diet Soda Linked to Obesity and Heart Disease

A new study finds that drinking diet soda actually leads to long-term weight gain among other health complications.

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Richard Scott
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